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1890'S HARVEST HOME FESTIVAL

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September 28, 2008.  The Historic Longstreet Farm in Holmdel, NJ hosted an 1890's country festival for the whole family, including music, animals, games, contests, wagon rides and educational demonstrations. 

Upon arrival I heard a wonderful barbershop chorus.

    

 

A horse drawn wagon circling the farm area was a very popular activity at the festival.

         

 

The Jugtown Mountain Stringband provided music in a casual outdoor setting.

    

 

With the help of a young visitor, my friend Eileen Allen provided ingredients for making apple pies.

 

They had lots of apple pies and the kids really enjoyed the pie eating contest.  Everyone had fun and the winner sure had a face full of pie. 

              

 

A Longstreet Farm regular and a friend of mine, The Music Man Rich Marzec.  Rich entertained us with his vintage 1890's accordion, which is a rare collector's item.

 

Making ice cream and apple juice, bee keeping and 1890's baseball were a few of the visual, instructional activities.  The "teachers" were all wearing clothing typical of the 1890's.

                   

 

Families enjoyed sawing a log using a "two man" saw.  When they finished the cut, they kept the log slice as a memento of the activity.  There was also a "stilts" area where the kids tried their balance on the wooden risers and a "guess the weight of the pumpkin" contest.

                                  

 

Arni and Ingrid entertained the visitors with a 19th century magic show.

    

 

As an aside, I enjoyed this young lady who was chasing a chicken.  She was gaining on the bird until it jumped through the fence.

    

 

The Wahoo Medicine Show, typical of the 1890's, entertained the kids.

         

 

Showing how to make yarn and clothing was very interesting to the kids.  They asked lots of questions.

           

 

To compliment the 1890's displays were the blacksmith shop, the carriage barn and the inside of typical farm house.

                   

 

Leaving the festival was this lone banjo player, typical of the 1890's farm environment.

 

It was a rainy weekend, but between noon and 5 PM it was clear and dry for the festival.  It was a most entertaining and informative day.

 

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